MIXING A SONG FROM START TO FINSIH

DO THIS FIRST: Download the Start to Finish Guide to Releasing a Song (FREE)

1. Setup The Mix

 

A lot of folk like to say the first step in mixing is to "static mix". Thing is, there are a few steps before you can start a "static mix" and that is making sure you have proper routing setup in your DAW.

It is important to have a fresh session when starting the mix process. You will want to keep you recording session and mixing session separate. So, duplicate your recording session, consolidate your tracks, and properly export the audio into wav. files. Then, create a new session for mixing. Import your audio tracks and setup your routing.

In this video I walk you through this setup process so that you can fully understand its importance.

2. Balance The Mix

Some refer to this step as "static mixing". What it is, is your first balance of the mix. This is when you find an average level on the faders that best sets the stage for the rest of the mixing process to follow. It is also when you find space for all of the tracks so that the stereo image is filled out.

Panning is another way we open up the mix and spread out the stereo image. I am not a follower of just panning instruments left, right, or center. There's many more areas to put things other than just those three. 

Taking the time to balance the mix will set up for a successful end product and will make things a lot more enjoyable once you start individual processing.

3. Mixing Templates

Mixing templates are a must for me. There are many variations and people will load them up with unnecessary plugins, but when setup right, a mixing template can become a console for you. 

I have special parallel processing that I use on EVERY MIX, it saves me time and gets me to a finished mix faster. I also have pre-calibrated return tracks that I know will sound great every time I merge my session with it.

Check out my video where I go over my mixing template and how to merge it with your session. All templates are available for download as well.

4. Mix Bus Processing

Mix bus processing is when you add EQ, Compression, Saturation, Limiting, and any other plugin you feel necessary to your mix bus or stereo bus. 

I like to add plugins with analog tone and sonics. Making these broad adjustments to the overall sound can really enhance the mix and help glue everything together.

It is important not to make any drastic moves with any of the plugins you have on your mix bus. "Top Down" mixing is easily misunderstood and therefor can ruin a mix. It is best to make subtle moves throughout the mixing process while checking your mix bus plugins and levels a long the way, instead of starting with your mix bus. 

5. Mixing

Even after mixing templates and mix bus processing, there are still individual tracks that need their own attentions and enhancements. 

I like to add plugins with analog tone and sonics. Making these broad adjustments to the overall sound can really enhance the mix and help glue everything together.

It is important not to make any drastic moves with any of the plugins you have on your mix bus. "Top Down" mixing is easily misunderstood and therefor can ruin a mix. It is best to make subtle moves throughout the mixing process while checking your mix bus plugins and levels a long the way, instead of starting with your mix bus. 

DO THIS FIRST: Download the Start to Finish Guide to Releasing a Song (FREE)

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